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Tanzania
Chamber of Commerce Country Factsheet Last update: 15.11.2017

Your advisors at the Chamber of Commerce

  • Daniel Sahr
    +352423939313
  • Thomas Bertrand
    +352423939337
Contact us: africa@cc.lu

Key Indicators

Area
947,300 km2
Population
51,045,882
Government type
presidential republic
Languages
Kiswahili or Swahili (official), Kiunguja (name for Swahili in Zanzibar), English (official, primary language of commerce, administration, and higher education), Arabic (widely spoken in Zanzibar), many local languages
GDP
$138.5 billion (2015 est.)
Growth rate
7% (2015 est.)
HDI
151
Capital
Dodoma

 

Introduction

Shortly after achieving independence from Britain in the early 1960s, Tanganyika and Zanzibar merged to form the United Republic of Tanzania in 1964. One-party rule ended in 1995 with the first democratic elections held in the country since the 1970s. Zanzibar's semi-autonomous status and popular opposition led to two contentious elections since 1995, which the ruling party won despite international observers' claims of voting irregularities. The formation of a government of national unity between Zanzibar's two leading parties succeeded in minimizing electoral tension in 2010.

Source: The CIA World Factbook - Tanzania

 

Macroeconomic indicators

Tanzania is one of the world's poorest economies in terms of per capita income, but has achieved high growth rates based on its vast natural resource wealth and tourism. GDP growth in 2009-15 was an impressive 6-7% per year. Dar es Salaam used fiscal stimulus measures and easier monetary policies to lessen the impact of the global recession. Tanzania has largely completed its transition to a market economy, though the government retains a presence in sectors such as telecommunications, banking, energy, and mining.

The economy depends on agriculture, which accounts for more than one-quarter of GDP, provides 85% of exports, and employs about 80% of the work force; agriculture accounts for 7% of government expenditures. All land in Tanzania is owned by the government, which can lease land for up to 99 years. Proposed reforms to allow for land ownership, particularly foreign land ownership, remain unpopular.

The financial sector in Tanzania has expanded in recent years and foreign-owned banks account for about 48% of the banking industry's total assets. Competition among foreign commercial banks has resulted in significant improvements in the efficiency and quality of financial services, though interest rates are still relatively high, reflecting high fraud risk. Recent banking reforms have helped increase private-sector growth and investment.

The World Bank, the IMF, and bilateral donors have provided funds to rehabilitate Tanzania's aging infrastructure, including rail and port, that provide important trade links for inland countries. In 2013, Tanzania completed the world's largest Millennium Challenge Compact grant, worth $698 million, and, in December 2014, the Millennium Challenge Corporation selected Tanzania for a second Compact.

In late 2014, a highly publicized scandal in the energy sector involving senior Tanzanian officials resulted in international donors freezing nearly $500 million in direct budget support to the government. The Tanzanian shilling weakened in 2015 because of lower gold prices, election-related political risk, and outflows from emerging market currencies generally.

IMF Statistics:

 

Luxembourg and the country

Existing conventions and agreements

Non double taxation agreement 

In order to promote international economic and financial relations in the interest of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, the Luxembourg government negotiates bilateral agreements for the avoidance of double taxation and prevent fiscal evasion with respect to Taxes on Income and on fortune with third countries.

None

Air Services agreement

None

Source: Administration des contributions directes

 

Further information

Foreign Trade

The Statec Foreign Trade statistics provide information on the trade of goods - by product and by country. This information is collected respectively through the INTRASTAT declaration and on the basis of customs documents.

You can see the statistics on the website of the Statec.

Contact points in Tanzania

Le Luxembourg est représenté par:
Ambassade Royale des Pays-Bas à Dar es Salam

Poste compétent pour les affaires consulaires:
Ambassade du Royaume de Belgique à Dar es Salam

Visa
Les demandes de visas pour se rendre au Luxembourg sont à adresser à la représentation de:
Ambassade du Royaume de Belgique à dar es Salam

Attaché(e) économique et commercial(e) - (AWEX)

M. Ivan Korsak

 

Ambassade de Begique

Limuu Road, Muthaïga, Nairobi

P.O. Box 30 461 Nairobi

 

Tel: 00254 20 71.22.547

Fax: 00254 20 71.22.613

Email: Nairobi(at)belemb.eu

 

Source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Luxembourg

Country risk as defined by Office du Ducroire for Tanzania

Ducroire is the only credit insurer covering open account deals in over 200 countries. A rating on a scale from 1 to 7 shows the intensity of the political risk. Category 1 comprises countries with the lowest political risk and category 7 countries with the highest. Macroeconomics experts also assess the repayment climate for all buyers in a country.

Link: Ducroire Office - Country Risk for Tanzania

 

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