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Serbia
Chambre de Commerce - Fiche d'information pays Dernière mise à jour: 15.05.2017

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  • Edith Stein
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  • Daniel Sahr
    +352423939313
Contactez-nous: europe@cc.lu

Indicateurs clés

Région
77,474 km2
Population
7,143,921 (July 2016 est.)
Type de gouvernement
republic
Langues
Serbian (official) 88.3%, Hungarian 3.8%, Bosniak 1.8%, Romany (Gypsy) 1.1%, other 4.1%, unknown 0.9% (2002 census)
PIB
$97.5 billion (2015 est.)
Taux de croissance
0.7% (2015 est.)
IHD
66
Capitale
Belgrade

 

Introduction

The Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes was formed in 1918; its name was changed to Yugoslavia in 1929. Communist Partisans resisted the Axis occupation and division of Yugoslavia from 1941 to 1945 and fought nationalist opponents and collaborators as well. The military and political movement headed by Josip Broz "TITO" (Partisans) took full control of Yugoslavia when their domestic rivals and the occupiers were defeated in 1945. Although communists, TITO and his successors (Tito died in 1980) managed to steer their own path between the Warsaw Pact nations and the West for the next four and a half decades. In 1989, Slobodan MILOSEVIC became president of the Republic of Serbia and his ultranationalist calls for Serbian domination led to the violent breakup of Yugoslavia along ethnic lines. In 1991, Croatia, Slovenia, and Macedonia declared independence, followed by Bosnia in 1992. The remaining republics of Serbia and Montenegro declared a new Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) in April 1992 and under MILOSEVIC's leadership, Serbia led various military campaigns to unite ethnic Serbs in neighboring republics into a "Greater Serbia." These actions ultimately failed and, after international intervention, led to the signing of the Dayton Peace Accords in 1995.

MILOSEVIC retained control over Serbia and eventually became president of the FRY in 1997. In 1998, an ethnic Albanian insurgency in the formerly autonomous Serbian province of Kosovo provoked a Serbian counterinsurgency campaign that resulted in massacres and massive expulsions of ethnic Albanians living in Kosovo. The MILOSEVIC government's rejection of a proposed international settlement led to NATO's bombing of Serbia in the spring of 1999. Serbian military and police forces withdrew from Kosovo in June 1999, and the UN Security Council authorized an interim UN administration and a NATO-led security force in Kosovo. FRY elections in late 2000 led to the ouster of MILOSEVIC and the installation of democratic government. In 2003, the FRY became the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro, a loose federation of the two republics. Widespread violence predominantly targeting ethnic Serbs in Kosovo in March 2004 led to more intense calls to address Kosovo's status, and the UN began facilitating status talks in 2006. In June 2006, Montenegro seceded from the federation and declared itself an independent nation. Serbia subsequently gave notice that it was the successor state to the union of Serbia and Montenegro.

In February 2008, after nearly two years of inconclusive negotiations, Kosovo declared itself independent of Serbia - an action Serbia refuses to recognize. At Serbia's request, the UN General Assembly (UNGA) in October 2008 sought an advisory opinion from the International Court of Justice (ICJ) on whether Kosovo's unilateral declaration of independence was in accordance with international law. In a ruling considered unfavorable to Serbia, the ICJ issued an advisory opinion in July 2010 stating that international law did not prohibit declarations of independence. In late 2010, Serbia agreed to an EU-drafted UNGA Resolution acknowledging the ICJ's decision and calling for a new round of talks between Serbia and Kosovo, this time on practical issues rather than Kosovo's status. Serbia and Kosovo signed the first agreement of principles governing the normalization of relations between the two countries in April 2013 and are in the process of implementing its provisions. Prime Minister Aleksandar VUCIC, has promoted an ambitious goal of Serbia joining the EU by 2020. Under his leadership, in January 2014 Serbia opened formal negotiations for accession.

Source: The CIA World Factbook - Serbia

 

Indicateurs macroéconomiques

IMF Statistics: 

Subject descriptor20142015201620172018
Gross domestic product, constant prices
Percent change
-1.8310.7412.5002.8003.500
Gross domestic product, current prices
U.S. dollars (Billions)
44.21136.51337.75539.54142.139
Gross domestic product per capita, current prices
U.S. dollars (Units)
6,199.1205,119.7575,293.9225,544.3945,908.678
Inflation, average consumer prices
Percent change
2.0821.3921.2863.1513.500
Volume of imports of goods and services
Percent change
3.2346.0736.9366.2025.947
Volume of exports of goods and services
Percent change
4.2228.2739.8908.8327.270
Unemployment rate
Percent of total labor force
20.12318.51018.58618.72618.312
Current account balance
U.S. dollars (Billions)
-2.632-1.751-1.596-1.524-1.591
Current account balance
Percent of GDP
-5.954-4.794-4.228-3.854-3.777
Colored cells are estimates

Source: IMF Statistics - Serbia

 

Le Luxembourg et le pays

Existing conventions and agreements

Non double taxation agreement 

In order to promote international economic and financial relations in the interest of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, the Luxembourg government negotiates bilateral agreements for the avoidance of double taxation and prevent fiscal evasion with respect to Taxes on Income and on fortune with third countries.

The Convention for the avoidance of double taxation between the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg and the Republic of Serbia has entered into force on 27 December 2016.Air Services agreement

(Voir: http://serbia.mae.lu/en/News/Entry-into-force-of-the-Convention-for-the-avoidance-of-double-taxation-between-Luxembourg-and-Serbia )

 

None

Source: Administration des contributions directes


 

http://www.impotsdirects.public.lu/conventions/conv_vig/index.html

 

Plus d'informations

Foreign Trade

The Statec Foreign Trade statistics provide information on the trade of goods - by product and by country. This information is collected respectively through the INTRASTAT declaration and on the basis of customs documents.

You can see the statistics on the website of the Statec.

 

Contact points in Serbia

Embassy of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg in Serbia

Ambassador with residence in Luxembourg:

Mr. Jean-Louis Thill 
9, rue du Palais de la Justice
L-1841 Luxembourg
Tel: +352 247 82350
Fax: +352 222048

Email: belgrade.amb(at)amb.etat.lu

http://serbia.mae.lu

Economic and Commercial Attaché:                                                     

Mrs. Marijana MILOSEVIC TUFEGDZIC 
Office of the Commercial Attache- Embassy of Belgium
Koce Kapetana 30, I floor, app 2
11000 Belgrade
Serbia

Tel ++381 11 3085570
fax ++381 11 344 56 49
Email Belgrade(at)brusselsinvestexport.com

www.brussels-in-serbia.com

http://www.invest-export.irisnet.be.

 

Source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs Luxembourg
Source: http://www.invest-export.irisnet.be

Country risk as defined by Office du Ducroire for Serbia

Ducroire is the only credit insurer covering open account deals in over 200 countries. A rating on a scale from 1 to 7 shows the intensity of the political risk. Category 1 comprises countries with the lowest political risk and category 7 countries with the highest. Macroeconomics experts also assess the repayment climate for all buyers in a country.

Link: Ducroire Office - Country Risk for Serbia

Other useful links

 

 

 

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