Ihr Partner für den Erfolg

Liechtenstein
Handelskammer - Land Infoblatt Letztes Update: 15.05.2017

Ihre Berater bei der Handelskammer

  • Steven Koener
    +352423939379
  • Diana Rutledge
    +352423939335
Kontaktieren Sie uns: europe@cc.lu

Kennzahlen

Bereich
160 km2
Bevölkerung
37,624 (July 2015 est.)
Regierungsform
constitutional monarchy
Sprachen
German (official), Alemannic dialect
BIP
$3.2 billion (2009)
Wachstumsrate
1.8% (2012 est.)
HDI
13
Hauptstadt
Vaduz

 

Einführung

The Principality of Liechtenstein was established within the Holy Roman Empire in 1719. Occupied by both French and Russian troops during the Napoleonic wars, it became a sovereign state in 1806 and joined the Germanic Confederation in 1815. Liechtenstein became fully independent in 1866 when the Confederation dissolved. Until the end of World War I, it was closely tied to Austria, but the economic devastation caused by that conflict forced Liechtenstein to enter into a customs and monetary union with Switzerland. Since World War II (in which Liechtenstein remained neutral), the country's low taxes have spurred outstanding economic growth. In 2000, shortcomings in banking regulatory oversight resulted in concerns about the use of financial institutions for money laundering. However, Liechtenstein implemented anti-money-laundering legislation and a Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty with the US that went into effect in 2003.

Source: The CIA World Factbook - Liechtenstein

 

Makroökonomische Indikatoren

Despite its small size and lack of natural resources, Liechtenstein has developed into a prosperous, highly industrialized, free-enterprise economy with a vital financial service sector and the third highest per capita income in the world, after Qatar and Luxembourg. The Liechtenstein economy is widely diversified with a large number of small businesses. Low business taxes - the maximum tax rate is 20% - and easy incorporation rules have induced many holding companies to establish nominal offices in Liechtenstein, providing 30% of state revenues.

The country participates in a customs union with Switzerland and uses the Swiss franc as its national currency. It imports more than 90% of its energy requirements. Liechtenstein has been a member of the European Economic Area (an organization serving as a bridge between the European Free Trade Association and the EU) since May 1995. The government is working to harmonize its economic policies with those of an integrated Europe.

Since 2008, Liechtenstein has faced renewed international pressure - particularly from Germany and the US - to improve transparency in its banking and tax systems. In December 2008, Liechtenstein signed a Tax Information Exchange Agreement with the US. Upon Liechtenstein's conclusion of 12 bilateral information-sharing agreements, the OECD in October 2009 removed the principality from its "grey list" of countries that had yet to implement the organization's Model Tax Convention. By the end of 2010, Liechtenstein had signed 25 Tax Information Exchange Agreements or Double Tax Agreements. In 2011, Liechtenstein joined the Schengen area, which allows passport-free travel across 26 European countries.

 

Luxemburg und das Land

Existing conventions and agreements

Non double taxation agreement 

In order to promote international economic and financial relations in the interest of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, the Luxembourg government negotiates bilateral agreements for the avoidance of double taxation and prevent fiscal evasion with respect to Taxes on Income and on fortune with third countries.

  • Convention and Exchange of letters from 26.08.2009
  • Act from 31.3.2010 (Memorial 2010, A, no. 51, p. 830)
  • Effective as of 17.12.2010 (Memorial 2011, A., No. 12, p. 87)

Air Services agreement

None

Source: Administration des contributions directes

 

Weitere Informationen

Foreign Trade

The Statec Foreign Trade statistics provide information on the trade of goods - by product and by country. This information is collected respectively through the INTRASTAT declaration and on the basis of customs documents.

You can see the statistics on the website of the Statec.

Contact points in Liechtenstein

Embassy of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg in Liechtenstein

Ambassador with residence in Berne: 

Marc THILL

45, Kramgasse B.P.619
CH-3000 BERNE 8

Tel.: +41 31 311 47 32/311 68 76/312 00 95
Fax: +41 31 311 00 19
Email: berne.amb(at)mae.etat.lu

Economic and Commercial Attaché (AWEX): Philippe DELCOURT

10 Rue Francois Bonivard
Geneva 1201

Tel: +41 22 788 48 60
Fax: +41 22 788 87 37
E-mail: geneve(at)awex-wallonia.com 

Honorary Consul

Honorary Consul General with jurisdiction in the Principality of Liechtenstein:  Mr. Matthias VOIGT   

Allmeinastrasse 11
LI-9497 Triesenberg
Fürstentum Liechtenstein

Tel: (+423) 262 00 70
E-Mail: matthias.voigt(at)tfconsult.li

Source: www.mae.lu 
Source: www.awex.com 

Country risk as defined by Office du Ducroire for Liechtenstein

Ducroire is the only credit insurer covering open account deals in over 200 countries. A rating on a scale from 1 to 7 shows the intensity of the political risk. Category 1 comprises countries with the lowest political risk and category 7 countries with the highest. Macroeconomics experts also assess the repayment climate for all buyers in a country.

Link: hthttp://www.ducroire.lu/en/node/41?country=128

Other useful links

Annuler les modification

 

Die Handelskammer und das Land

Keine Veranstaltungen zu diesem Land